Archive for ‘Uncategorized’

June 29, 2020

Emergence of the Antique & Curiosity Dealer book published

I thought you may be interested to hear that my new book, The Emergence of the Antique & Curiosity Dealer in Britain 1815-1850: the commodification of historical objects has finally been published, and it has now been released from the warehouses that have been holding it (in India I think?).  The book has been a very (very) long time in gestation – 10 years in fact, and I won’t bore you with the complicated history of its genesis – suffice to say that I have been busy with many, many other things.  And, for all those that are sitting on what they think are long dead book projects, the Emergence is a testament to keeping faith, and a testament to the many people who have supported me over the years; and of course to my publisher, Routledge (who were ‘Ashgate’, when I signed the contract back in the day!) for keeping faith too – and a special thanks to all at Routledge for their patience.  I can’t say what people will think of the book of course, but I hope someone out there likes it, or at least appreciates the effort!

Here’s the blurb for the book, in case you wonder what it’s actually about – Rather than the customary focus on the activities of individual collectors, The Emergence of the Antique and Curiosity Dealer in Britain 1815-1850: The Commodification of Historical Objects illuminates the less-studied roles played by dealers in the nineteenth-century antique and curiosity markets. Set against the recent ‘art market turn’ in scholarly literature, this volume examines the role, activities, agency and influence of antique and curiosity dealers as they emerged in the opening decades of the nineteenth century. This study begins at the end of the Napoleonic Wars, when dealers began their wholesale importations of historical objects; it closes during the 1850s, after which the trade became increasingly specialized, reflecting the rise of historical museums such as the South Kensington Museum (V&A). Focusing on the archive of the early-nineteenth-century London dealer John Coleman Isaac (c.1803-1887), as well as drawing on a wide range of other archival and contextual material, Mark Westgarth considers the emergence of the dealer in relation to a broad historical and cultural landscape. The emergence of the antique and curiosity dealer was part of the rapid economic, social, political and cultural change of early-nineteenth-century Britain, centered around ideas of antiquarianism, the commercialization of culture, and a distinctive and evolving interest in historical objects. This book will be of interest to scholars in art history, histories of collecting, museum and heritage studies, and nineteenth century culture.

I’m sorry it’s rather expensive – at £120 it’s quite a whack (as they say!), but that’s academic publishing for you I guess; the economic model must take account of the fact that only half a dozen people will actually buy it!?…My other book (SOLD! The Great British Antiques Story) by contrast, is FREE, as you may know (thanks to the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art).

Anyway, if you are at all interested in this arcane subject, then Emergence may be one for you.

Mark

May 23, 2020

Antique Silver Dealers – Jay, Richard Attenborough & Co. archive

It’s amazing what turns up at auction sometimes – during ‘Lockdown’ I seem to have ‘saleroom.com’ constantly running in the background whilst I’m writing on my PC; last week, at Keys Fine Art in Aylsham, Norfolk, a rather dishevelled old album caught my eye. Lot 217, described as ‘Vintage Album containing various photographs of hallmarked silver and other artworks’ sounded rather intriguing, and I recognised the type of photographs and that it was probably a silver dealer’s album – so I had to buy it of course; it was a bargain I think, just £12 plus commissions and postage, so cost about £24 all told (and thank you to Keys Fine Art Auctions for packaging the lot so well and posting it so promptly!).

 

‘Vintage Album’, Keys Fine Art Auctions, Norfolk.

The album arrived in the post this week. I guess the album itself dates from c.1900 – it has an old title on the original red leather spine ‘Photographs & Records of Cups and Presentation Plate’ – although it has been recovered in plain brown paper at some stage, and as you can see it is in a very distressed condition.

The album turned out to be a fascinating record of the well-known London-based silversmiths and antique silver dealers ‘Jay, Richard Attenborough & Co Ltd‘.  In some business letters, dating from the 1920s and which have been pasted into the album, Attenborough described themselves as ‘Goldsmiths, Diamond Merchants and Watchmakers’; they traded from 142-144 Oxford Street, London, from c.1905 until the late 1950s, although like many 20th century antique silver dealers (such as Harman & Lambert, or Birch & Gaydon), Attenborough can trace their genealogy into the 18th century – their business letterhead states that they were established in 1796. The Attenborough business was acquired by the silversmith James Charles Jay in 1887 and by 1904 had become Jay, Richard Attenborough & Co Ltd – the business seems to have closed sometime in the 1960s? They were listed as ‘antique silver dealers’ in the London Trade Directories in the 1920s-1950s. As silversmiths, Attenborough also sold antique silver and indeed the album exemplifies the continued tradition within silversmithing of buying and selling second-hand and antique silver. The famous firm of S.J. Phillips, for example, began as silversmiths and jewellers in the 19th century and many other antique silver dealers can trace their origins as silversmiths.

The contents of the album are mainly photographs of modern silver made by Attenborough in the 1920s to the 1950s, but there are also many photos of 18th and 19th century antique silver, including this amazing George II silver basket – in the style of Paul de Lamerie (1688-1751).

George II Silver Basket; Jay, Richard Attenborough & Co Ltd album, photograph c.1930s?

Some of the most interesting photographs in the album illustrate pieces of antique silver that have been remounted as presentation pieces by Jay, Richard Attenborough & Co in the 1920s and 1930s.  This silver punch bowl dating from 1870 has been remounted for presentation in 1924.  There is a long description of the object in the album; ‘Silver Punch Bowl, weighing 144 ounces, standing 14 inches high, and measuring 18 inches across. It is entirely wrought and chased by hand, and bears the Victorian Hall mark for the year 1870. The body of the bowl is decorated with repousse work in high relief of figures of horsemen and footmen in armour, symbolising battle scenes from early English history. The pedestal foot is ornamented with a series of wreathed designs of oak leaves and acorns; the whole forming a remarkable and unique specimen of the silversmith’s art. It was originally on [sic] the collection of the late Viscount Chaplin, who was a great patron of the turf, and a thorough sportsman, also a political associate of the Rt. Hon. Joseph Chamberlain. The inscription engraved on the foot is as follows:- Monday, 14th July, 1924 ‘To have the honour to meet H.R.H. The Prince of Wales’ Souvenir of ‘At Home’ at the Jamaica Court. BRITISH EMPIRE EXHIBITION, WEMBLEY.’

The album also contains dozens of photographs of commissions for presentation cups and plate that the firm created in the early and mid 20th century. Here, for example, is ‘The Spectaclemakers Cup’, made to commemorate the tercentenary of the granting of the Royal Charter by Charles I in 1629; ‘made in May 1930 for Sir Osborn Holmden’ – who was made Master of the Worshipful Company of Spectaclemakers in 1928.

The wide range of commissions for silver that the firm undertook is illustrated by these two further examples – a large silver presentation salver, made as a gift to William Lawrence Stephenson Esq. on his retirement as chairman of F.W. Woolworth & Co. Ltd. in 1948.

And the winner’s trophy for the Miss World Competition in 1955, which that year was held in London.

That year, the fifth edition of the now highly contentious and outdated competition, Miss Venezuela, Susanna Duijm, won the competition; here she is, holding the trophy made by Jay, Richard Attenborough & Co Ltd.

As well as the photographs of modern and antique silver, the album also contains a small number of fascinating watercolour designs for cups and medals, including these beautiful watercolours for designs for a medal for the Vegetarian Cycling and Athletic Club, dating from the 1930s.  The Club was established in 1888 and is still going.

The Attenborough album is an amazing document, one that clearly demonstrates how the practices of antique dealing, and those of contemporary design, have been in continuous flux.  The album will be making its way to the Special Collections at the Brotherton Library at the University of Leeds in due course!

Mark

May 11, 2020

Antique Dealer Research Project Newsletter – Spring 2020

Hello all friends and colleagues,

I hope you are all staying safe and well and everyone in your respective families are all OK and well too.  We thought, in these very challenging times, that you might like to hear about all the things that the antique dealers research project has been involved in over the past few months – and to hear about our future plans in the Post-Covid-19 world (not much detail on that front at present I’m afraid…but do keep an eye on the antique dealer research project blog for news, as and when things start to settle down).  But anyway, we have developed a new initiative – our Antique Dealer Research Project Newsletter – the first of which is attached here – Newsletter No.1 – ADRP Issue 01 HiRes FINAL (1)

We do hope that you enjoy reading the News – and hope that you remain safe and well.

Very best wishes

Stay Safe

Mark

April 20, 2020

Lockdown Quiz – Answers!

Looks like the Lockdown Quiz was rather too daunting and appears to have defeated everyone! We didn’t get one completed or even semi completed response to the quiz. The Christie’s Christmas Quiz from 1978 was indeed a fiendish beast, and if I’m honest, I don’t think, even with the help of Google it was possible to answer many of the questions.  There certainly were some really perplexing questions; who knew, for example that Augustus John and King George V were the only British Army Officers that were allowed to keep their beards in World War One (Question 23)? Or the answer to question 84 – ‘If James Yates is 5338, who is 2341’?….the numbers are pewterers numbers, so, obviously, 2341 is Robert Hitchman!….of course!…

There were some rather standard empirical art history questions, which I guess many people would be able to answer quite easily – Question 26, for example, which asked to match up the ‘ism’ to the artist; or question 14, which asked to name the artist who painted particular paintings – such questions seemed pretty easy to deal with, especially with the help of Google – but many other questions seemed to be rather obtuse – I particularly liked question 16 – ‘L.S.D. stands for what?’….no, it was not acid (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide), but ‘Librae. Solidi. Denarii.’

Some of the questions were too obviously time specific – question 22, for example ‘What is the record for an ‘elephant’ – one needed to know that an ‘elephant’ is a folio size, and that the record at auction in 1978 was £216,393; or question 61, ‘Which proved more expensive: vultures, bantam cocks or cocatoos’ – (they are all birds modelled by the Meissen porcelain factory, and hence, it’s Vultures….of course!).

Anyway, I know you will all be waiting to see the answers to the quiz, to see how you did – so here are the answers!….Hope you did well, even if you didn’t submit your answers for the prize!

Answers 1-40:

Answers 41-100:

They were really hard, weren’t they!

Mark

April 13, 2020

Lockdown Art and Antiques Quiz – Christie’s Christmas Quiz 1978

In these challenging days of ‘Lockdown’ we all need distractions – so how about an art history and antique collecting quiz, from back in the day – from 1978 to be precise, and a fiendishly difficult one too!  The Christie’s (auctioneers) ‘Christmas Quiz 1978’, which is a real mind boggler!

1978 – think Space Invaders, think Grease and Saturday Night Fever at the cinema, Charlie’s Angels and Love Boat on TV, boogie woogie disco clothes, and public services strikes in the UK – so what on earth was the state of knowledge in the art and antique markets in Britain at the time – well, exceptionally wide and very extensive if we go by the standard of the questions in the Christie’s 1978 Quiz!……here’s just one example to perplex you!…Question 33 – ‘What do Bawbee, Merk and Plack have in common?’….what on earth?…..and there are much more difficult questions!
The quiz has 100 questions, all related to art, antiques and collecting, with a few questions on wine too (as one might expect in a cultural quiz!).

There’s a prize for the winner – a print copy of the recently published SOLD! Great British Antiques Story exhibition catalogue will be posted to the winner (anywhere in the world!) – you have ONE WEEK (so the quiz deadline is Monday 20th April – 12.00pm UK time) to complete the quiz (I’d be very surprised if anyone managed to get all 100 questions correct!).  Email your answers to the project email address:

antiquedealers@leeds.ac.uk

The winner will be announced here on the project blog on Monday 20th April at 5.00pm – GOOD LUCK! – I have all of the answers to the quiz of course and will publish them on here on Monday 20th April – I’m guessing people will try to google some of the answers, but I’d be surprised if all of the questions can be googled!

Anyway, here you go…here’s all the questions, in each of the pages from the 1978 quiz

Questions 1-13

 

Questions 14-30

Questions 31-42

Questions 43-57

Questions 58-72

Questions 73-87

Questions 88-100

GOOD LUCK!

Mark

 

April 5, 2020

SOLD! Exhibition Catalogue

The SOLD! exhibition catalogue is now published –

and thanks to the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, and the AHRC (Arts & Humanities Research Council) we are able to make the digital E-Version of the SOLD! catalogue free for everyone – you can download the PDF version (9Mb at 72dpi) – here’s the PDF below; Enjoy!

SOLD Catalogue – WEB 72dpi revised

March 8, 2020

Quinneys – costumes

Our progress on re-staging our performance of Quinneys is coming along well; yesterday (a Saturday no less!) India Walton and I went to the Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire stores to choose the costumes for all the characters in the play – India is playing the part of ‘Mable Dredge’, Quinney’s typist, who in the play is in the triangle of love between James (Quinney’s foreman – played by Fergus Johnston) and Posy (Quinney’s daugther – played by Annabel Marlow) – here, (below) is India (left), with Annabel (centre) and Fergus (right) in rehearsals earlier in the week.

India, Annabel and Fergus in rehearsals for Quinneys.

India and I spent all day in the costume store – it was exhausting (10.15am til 4.00pm!) but great fun! And we managed to find costumes for every character in the play.  Here’s India, choosing a nightdress for ‘Mable Dredge’, with Steff, from the costume hire, who was such a fantastic help all day! All the costume we needed dates from the Edwardian period (the play is set in 1914), and there are brilliant resources at the Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire.

India and Steff and Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire

India and Steff and Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire

We hope that the actors (and George Rodosthenous, our theater director for the performance of Quinneys) all approve of the costumes that India and I chose.

We’ve made the characters of the American millionaire collectors, ‘Cyrus P. Hunsaker’ and ‘Dupont Jordan’ (played by Stephenson Catney and Jake Pursell, respectively) rather bold, brash and ostentatious……with a brightly coloured jacket in red, yellow and black check pattern, and a similar jacket in brown and yellow checks – they will look out-rage-ous in the play! – especially as ‘Cyrus’ accepts a large ‘cheque’ (a ‘check in American parlance) from Mr Quinney at one point in the play….

For ‘Quinney’ himself (played by Samuel Parmenter) we decided he should be very smartly and expensively dressed, but rather more soberly – so we put him in a light grey morning suit – a dapper chap, but with a restrained, serious personality. For Mrs Susan Quinney (played by Hannah Rooney) we went for two Edwardian dresses, both in an elegant green – one with fabulous black embroidery to the sleeves.

And for ‘Posy’ (Quinney’s daugther, played by Annabel Marlow) we found a light and delicate pale blue dress, together with some some Edwardian blouses in white, with small red flowers, and a cream-coloured long flowing Edwardian skirt. We also found suitable dresses for ‘Mable Dredge’ – slightly more plain, given Mable’s status as Quinney’s typist, but still very elegant – (India enjoyed choosing her costume!)…. And finally we found a very swish black jacket with black velvet trousers for ‘Sam Tomlin’ the smart (and smarmy) Bond Street antique dealer, (played by Morgan Buswell), and for ‘James Miggott’ (Quinney’s foreman…played by Fergus Johnston) we found a suitable ‘workman’s’ outfit, but one that still retains a degree of Edwardian elegance….

Here are all the costume’s on the rail at Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire –

Quinneys play costume at Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire.

We still need a few Edwardian hats and accessories, but the costume for the performance is all coming together well – I’m sure that the actors will thoroughly enjoy their rehearsals now that we have costumes – and that their performances will become even more authentic and ’embodied’!

Mark

 

March 4, 2020

More Quinneys Rehearsals

Our rehearsals for the performance of Quinneys are continuing apace – (the play is to be staged at The Witham, Barnard Castle, on Saturday 28th March – to book tickets, click to the weblink to The Witham here).  George Rodosthenous, (Director of the theatre and performance BA/MA programmes at the University of Leeds), and the director of the play, has been ramping up the number of rehearsals over the last two weeks, as the student actors begin to inhabit their characters in ever increasing degrees of authenticity!  Here (below) is one of George’s professional black and white photographs of (almost) the full cast of Quinneys (only Jake, who has recently joined the cast to play the part of Dupont Jordan, is absent…but you can see Jake further in this blog post, below) – in the photo below are, left to right, India (Mable Dredge, Quinney’s typist), Stephenson (Cyrus P. Hunsaker, American millionaire collector), Annabel (Posy, Quinney’s daughter) on Fergus’s (James, Quinney’s foreman) knee; with Samuel (Quinney) and Hannah (Mrs Susan Quinney) behind, and Morgan (Sam Tomlin, fellow antique dealer) to the right.

The cast of Quinneys in rehearsals at the University of Leeds.

And here’s the cast in rehearsals again, this time without Samuel (Quinney) but with Jake Pursell (playing the role of the American millionaire collector, Dupont Jordan) in the centre, on his knees examining a chair – Jake is an MA student, and has immediately immersed himself in the role…being from Texas, USA, himself!

The cast of Quinneys – without Samuel (Quinney), but with Jake (Dupont Jordan).

In the photograph (below) Jake (Dupont) and Stephenson (as Cyrus P. Hunsaker, another American collector in the play), greet Annabel (Posy), with India (Mable) and Fergus (James) to the right – and George, directing the play (but here playing Quinney). In the foreground is an inanimate ‘actor’, (a reproduction ‘Persian’ vase) taking the part of the rare ‘Kang Hsi, mirror-black bottle’ that also stars in the play.

Jake, George, Stephenson, Annabel, Fergus and India in Quinneys rehearsals

Indeed, in this week’s rehearsals we used some stand-in props for the real antiques that we will be using as part of the set for the play. In the 1910 and 1920s, when Quinneys was first performed, several leading antique dealers, such as Moss Harris and Walter Thornton-Smith, provided appropriate antiques for the set – and for our performance at The Witham, we have been lucky that several antique dealers, and also the Bowes Museum itself, have agreed to loan antiques for the play.  For rehearsals of course, we need ‘stand-ins’, and in the photograph (below), Samuel (Quinney) and Stephenson (Hunsaker) discuss a rare Charles II walnut armchair (which will be on loan from the Bowes Museum) using a large blown-up photograph (fixed to the cream seminar room chair, between them) of the very chair that will be in the performance!

Samuel (Quinney) and Stephenson (Hunsaker) discuss an ‘antique’ chair in rehearsals for Quinneys.

We did manage to use one real antique in the rehearsals – a 19th century key, one that Posy places in the Kang Hsi ‘mirror black, bottle’ and which opens an antique lacquer cabinet that is one of the stars of the show (in terms of inanimate objects at least) and into which she has placed a love letter to James – and here’s the very key – appropriately, given that it is the key that opens a cabinet into which a love letter rests, shaped like a ‘heart’!

The key to Posy’s Heart – from Quinneys!

One of the aspects of the performance that we will be debating and discussing in the proposed workshop on Sunday 29th March – the day following the re-staging of Quinneys – is the complexity of the idea of ‘authenticity’ in a workshop titled ‘Dealing with Authenticity’ and led by our colleague Professor Jonathan Pitches (Professor of Performance at the University of Leeds) – so having the actors working with ‘fake’ antiques, and then working with the genuine thing, will be something we might ruminate upon; as well, of course, as what it means to embody, to become, a character in a play as part of a performance.

Indeed, what is especially interesting (for me) is that the fictional character of the antique dealer Joseph Quinney is actually based on a real life antique dealer, called Thomas Rohan, who was trading in Bournemouth and Southampton at the time that Horace Vachell composed his play (and associated novel) – and, as if to reinforce the point, here is Samuel, holding a photocopy of a photograph of Thomas Rohan, of about 1920 – Samuel becoming Thomas Rohan, becoming Joseph Quinney!

Samuel, as Quinney, as Rohan.

And here’s a few more photographs of the student actors in rehearsals – they are all fantastic actors and are performing brilliantly – you will miss something special if you don’t get to see the play!….seats are going fast, so do book before they all go!

Hannah (Mrs Susan Quinney) and Samuel (Quinney) in rehearsal.

Annabel (Posy), Hannah (Mrs Quinney) and Fergus (James) in rehearsals for Quinneys.

India (Mable), Annabel (Posy) and Fergus (James) in rehearsals for Quinneys.

And finally, an amusing shot, from an amusing scene in the play, with Annabel (Posy) and Fergus (James) in foreground, with Samuel (Quinney) and Hannah (Mrs Quinney) in the background, sneaking a look at the two young lovers – (in the play, the whiteboard will be an 18th century  Chinese lacquer screen…..we hope!)

Mark

Annabel (Posy) and Fergus (James), with Samuel (Quinney) and Hannah (Mrs Quinney) in the background – rehearsals for Quinneys.

 

February 9, 2020

Quinneys Rehearsals

Our rehearsals for the play Quinneys continue apace – with Dr George Rodosthenous leading the direction of the performances.  This week George assembled the whole team, including Professor Jonathan Pitches, who is taking the lead on the ‘Dealing with Authenticity’ workshop which takes place at The Bowes Museum on the day following the restaging of Quinneys at the Witham in Barnard Castle.  Here’s the whole team at the rehearsals –

The Quinneys team – back (Annabel, Mark, Fergus), middle (Stephenson, Hannah, Samuel), Front (George, Jonathan, India, Morgan).

George (centre) directing India (sitting) and Morgan (back) and Fergus (right) in rehearsals for Quinneys.

George had the cast reading sections of the play, revealing insights into the characterisations, and drawing out some great performances from the actors.

Annabel and Fergus reading for ‘Posy’ and ‘James’.

Here’s (left) Annabel and Fergus taking on the character of ‘Posy’ (Quinneys’ daughter) and ‘James Miggot’ (Quinney’s workshop foreman).  And (right), George, directing India (seated), playing ‘Mable Dredge’ (Quinney’s typist), and Morgan (background) playing ‘Cyrus P. Hunsaker’ the American millionaire collector, with Fergus as ‘James’.

And another few photos of the cast getting into character – with (left to right) India, Samuel (as the eponymous Joseph Quinney), Morgan, Annabel and Fergus, rehearsing a scene set in ‘Quinney’s sanctuary’ – Quinney’s collector’s paradise, full of extraordinary antiques.

Quinneys actors – (left to right) India, Samuel, Morgan, Annabel, Fergus.

We are working with The Bowes Museum and local antique dealers in Barnard Castle to source the antiques for the stage set.  In 1915, when the play was first performed, several well-known London antique dealers loaned antiques for the set, including Walter and Ernest Thornton-Smith, who, co-incidently (or maybe not) traded in Soho Square, London, which was also the fictional location of Quinney’s  antique  shop in the novel ‘Quinneys’ (1915).  Indeed, one of the aspects we are thinking through in the restaging of Quinneys is the notion of authenticity – Jonathan Pitches will be working with the actors, reflecting on authenticity of performance and authenticity of character in acting, alongside me (Mark) working on authenticity of objects (antiques) and authenticity of identity (of antique dealers), in the ‘Dealing with Authenticity’ workshop on the day following the performance at The Bowes Museum.

To that end, George got me to work with an imaginary ‘antique chair’, examining it as if I were an antique dealer, for the student actors – (that’s as much acting as I am going to do!) –

Mark, explaining how an antique dealer examines an ‘antique’ chair……

Hannah, another of the student actors, also joined in the rehearsals, playing the part of Susan Quinney, Quinney’s wife – here’s Annabel (left) as ‘Posy’, with Hannah (right) as ‘Susan’, reading from a scene in Act 1.

Annabel (left) and Hannah (right) rehearsing for Quinneys.

George and the actors are certainly creating a fantastic atmosphere, and I am sure that when Quinneys is eventually performed on Saturday 28th March at The Witham, is will be a brilliant production!  Here’s a final few photos of George and the team.

George (centre) with the student actors at the rehearsals for Quinneys.

And a final, much more professional photograph, of Stephenson, India and Samuel (back row), with Annabel and Fergus (front).

part of the cast for Quinneys – Stephenson, India, Samuel (back) with Annabel and Fergus (front)

Don’t forget to book your tickets for Quinneys – you can book your seat HERE

Mark

February 6, 2020

Antique Dealer Archives at the Brotherton Special Collections

Our colleagues in the Brotherton Library Special Collections (BLSC) have been doing amazing work on the conservation and cataloguing of the antique dealer archives in their collections over the past year – cleaning and conserving the Phillips of Hitchin and the Roger Warner archives, as well as creating online catalogue entries for the material. Karen Sayers, one of the archivists in BLSC recently composed an introductory blog post on the Roger Warner collection on the Leeds University Library Blog – you can read Karen’s blog here – Leeds University Library Blog and a catalogue entry detail on the Roger Warner material – catalogue entry

Roger Warner’s antique shop in Burford, c.1970.

Karen has been very busy with the antique dealer archives recently; she has also created a Wikipedia entry on Roger Warner, see Roger Warner wikipedia

The Leeds University Library team and volunteers have also posted a couple of other updates on the work done on the antique dealer archives – here’s the post by Kiri Douglas, conservation student from Camberwell College of Art, London, recounting her work on conservation of the Phillips of Hitchin archive in 2018 – read Kiri’s blog post here.   And Karen Sayer’s blog post on the progress of the conservation of the Phillips of Hitchin archive back in 2018 – read Karen’s blog post here.

Phillips of Hitchin shop, Hitchin, c.1910. Digital copy of glass-plate negative courtesy of the V&A Museum.

It’s thanks to all in the Brotherton Library Special Collections that these rare and fascinating antique dealer archives are becoming more available to researchers and the general public and are proving to be an incredibly rich resource for the various research projects that we are undertaking.

Mark

Home Subjects

a working group dedicated to the display of art in the private interior, c. 1715-1914

The Period Room: Museum, Material, Experience

An International Conference hosted by The Bowes Museum and The University of Leeds

H. Blairman & Sons Ltd

A research project investigating the history of the antiques trade in Britain in the 20th century

Museum Studies Now?

'Museum Studies Now?' is an event which aims to discuss and debate museum and heritage studies education provision.

The Burlington Magazine Index Blog

art writing * art works * art market

East India Company at Home, 1757-1857

A research project investigating the history of the antiques trade in Britain in the 20th century